Exhibition

Exhibition 2018
Yuki Tsukiyama
2018.07.06(Friday) - 2018.08.04(Saturday) OPENING PARTY :2018.07.07 SAT | 19 : 00 - OPEN : TUE - SAT | 12:00 - 19:00
CLOSED : SUN, MON & HOLIDAYS

TEZUKAYAMA GALLERY is pleased to announce  ‘Exhibition 2018,’ a solo exhibition by Kobe-based sculptor Tsukiyama Yuki.

Born in 1976, Tsukiyama graduated in 2000 from the sculpture department of Kyoto University of Art and Design, and is now based in his native Kobe, working enthusiastically as a sculptor around Kansai.

Although Tsukiyama deals with such varied materials as metal, resin, wood, and paint, the starting point of his works is always the materials themselves. By repeated experiments which he calls ‘having fun,’ he grasps the materials’ inherent characteristics, and this approach can be seen integrated into Tsukiyama’s practice as one part of his work’s theme.  Moreover, while the elements composing them are simple, Tsukiyama presents a great number of works which seemingly could not be realized without his own personal point of view and tenacity to perform repetitive acts to the point of stoicism.

In the exhibition, Tsukiyama cuts 45mm squared timber finely with a hand saw, and then arranges the pieces with great care to join the woodgrains of the resulting cross-sections, forming a circle in the gallery space that makes one think of the rings of a great tree.

Because of the thousands of pieces, the arranged circular shape tells of the accumulation of Tsukiyama’s patiently repeated acts in his studio, while simultaneously letting us experience a great flow of time that exceeds human understanding.

[Artist statement]

When you observe the rings carved in the 45mm squared timber, they are truly unique. Depending on things such as the kind of tree and the environment that it has grown in, while there are trees that grow for six years, there are some that need nearly thirty years to reach the same size. It takes about forty seconds for me to cut them with my hand saw. It made me feel strange to cut a tree that has grown over many decades in just a few seconds. Doing this and then piling up 6400 pieces slice by slice, I make an enormous imaginary circle.

In the summer of 2017 I had the idea for this work, and one year later it is finally finished.

TEXT DATA[PDF]

PRESS RELEASE [PDF]

Drawing for ‘Taruki Crossing’